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Author Topic: break up during a call.  (Read 3430 times)
paininthebuttusername
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Posts: 2


« on: January 14, 2018, 05:53:35 pm »

I've had the OBI200 for quite a while and I pair it with Google Voice on my computer. Recently for the past month or so people I am talking with report to me that, during a sentence, a couple of words are unrecognizable.

I have gone into the Obi website, removed the OBI there and reinstalled it. I have rebooted my modem and router numerous times.

Any suggestions?
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SteveInWA
Hero Member & Beta Tester
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Posts: 4662



« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2018, 08:41:35 pm »

This is typically caused by either your Internet Service Provider (ISP) or some other, heavy use on your home network, such as online gaming, HD video streaming, etc.

Typical home internet service is asymmetric:  the download speed to your end is much faster than the upload speed.  When you are talking, you are using the less-capable upload link, which can be more susceptible to degradation.

Cable internet service is also susceptible to problems with the coaxial cable delivering the signal to your modem.  Rainy/snowy/icy weather can cause water incursion into the cables and their connectors, cables can get damaged by construction, rodents or tree roots, and connectors can get corroded.

Basic speedtests are meaningless for VoIP.  You can, however, look at your call quality in real time.  To do this, you can log into the OBi's local web server.  Pick up the phone attached the OBi and key in ***1 to hear its IP address.  Go to that IP address in your browser.  The default login is admin/admin.  During a call while you are talking, go to the Status-->Call status page.  You should see statistics about the call, including a MOS number.  A MOS lower than 4.0 indicates a problem with your internet service.
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paininthebuttusername
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Posts: 2


« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2018, 10:01:06 am »

Well, I have a D-Link router and I can access the D-Link router setting. I can't "go to that IP address in my browser"....If I do that, then all it will display is general information about IP numbers. So, logged into my D-Link account with my browser I see NOTHING in there that has Status-Call. I've got status....but nothing about Call or anything else showing any movement,That doesn't tell me anything regarding what my quality of the call is. Perhaps you have a different router that has that capability, I don't know. All I know is that your instructions don't seem to be applicable to all brands.

I appreciate you trying though!
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SteveInWA
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Posts: 4662



« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2018, 10:17:27 am »

Well, I have a D-Link router and I can access the D-Link router setting. I can't "go to that IP address in my browser"....If I do that, then all it will display is general information about IP numbers. So, logged into my D-Link account with my browser I see NOTHING in there that has Status-Call. I've got status....but nothing about Call or anything else showing any movement,That doesn't tell me anything regarding what my quality of the call is. Perhaps you have a different router that has that capability, I don't know. All I know is that your instructions don't seem to be applicable to all brands.

I appreciate you trying though!

Hunh?  I am not talking about your router.

The OBi device is a little computer.  One of the things it does, just like your router, and just like many little boxes that connect to the internet, is to run its own little web server, inside that OBi box.

You need to access the OBi's own web server, not your router!  I explained how to do that above.  Obtain the OBi's IP address by picking up the attached telephone, and keying in ***1.  A synthetic voice will read out the IP address.  Enter that IP address in your browser's address bar, and go there.
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Starbudder
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Posts: 1


« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2018, 03:53:31 pm »

I have the similar problem, audio breakup during calls which started a few months ago.  I conducted the test described above and I do have MOS readings below 4.0 (3.95 - 4.0) after multiple tests.
 
Just wondering whether anyone has had success with their cable company to fix this issue?
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prem
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Posts: 1


« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2018, 08:43:46 pm »

Thanks a lot to SteveInWA for the tip.  I had noticed the same call break up issue when calling in to my Obi200 - not terrible quality but irritating enough. I see that the MOS for me during a call does fall below 4 often but sometimes it is above 4; the highest I saw was 4.44.  Nothing else was using the internet in my home at that time.

I did a speed test and saw that my upload speed was coming to about 2.4Mb/sec (though download was 27 Mb/sec).  I am thinking to change my internet service.  Would appreciate if you can suggest what kind of upload speed I would need to see MOS speeds high enough to avoid this break up issue.
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SteveInWA
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Posts: 4662



« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2018, 09:09:04 pm »

Well, raw speed isn't the main issue; it's the quality of the connection overall.  I guess one could compare it to eating a big pile of McDonald's vs. eating a small, but delicious meal at a nice restaurant.

The MOS includes other factors, such as jitter and dropouts.

Upgrading to the next higher tier of service would probably help, but replacing/upgrading your modem/router might also help.  If you are using cable internet service, the newer DOCSIS 3.0 or 3.1 cable modems are much better than the earlier generations.  Also, coaxial cable problems are often contributors to dropouts.  Coax is susceptible to water incursion and corrosion of the connectors.  If rodents or somebody's shovel damages the cable sheath, for example, it'll cause signal degredation.

If your service is on DSL, your provider may also have some newer equipment for you to upgrade.

If your service is a pure fiber-to-the-premises service like FiOS, then you may have a failing fiber ONT.
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