June 17, 2019, 12:36:21 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
News:
 
   Forum Home   Search Login Register OBiTALK  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Obi100 as ATA for Skype?  (Read 21863 times)
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« on: January 10, 2012, 10:23:15 pm »

I would like to subscribe to a 2nd VoIP service in addition to Google Voice when I switch to VoIP.  Can the Obi100 be configured to interface with Skype as the 2nd service?

TimDan
Logged
RonR
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4527


« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2012, 10:39:03 pm »

The OBi is not capable of interfacing directly with Skype, but it can make calls through Skype if used in conjunction with a program (SipToSis) running on a PC.  I run this combination and it works reasonably well.

This post is a little lacking, but I can update it if it's something you're interested in pursuing:

Using SipToSis to Make and Receive Skype Calls Through an OBi
Logged
Ostracus
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 576


« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2012, 10:49:59 pm »

There are also Skype specific ATAs as well.
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 08:15:49 am »

The OBi is not capable of interfacing directly with Skype, but it can make calls through Skype if used in conjunction with a program (SipToSis) running on a PC.... 

Thanks, RonR.  I'm hoping to set up a system not requiring a running PC and which uses a minimum no. of ATAs.  I read repeatedly that the OBi100 and OB110 can interface with two VoIP services, but I've never seen a list of the specific VoIP services which can be used.  Google Voice is the only one consistently mentioned.  It appears, then, that I'll have to use an ATA with each VoIP service and switch my desktop telephone between them manually.

TimDan
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2012, 08:22:55 am »

There are also Skype specific ATAs as well.

Yes, I have seen the one on the Skype website and advertized on Amazon.  I have also seen the dedicated desktop telephone with an internal ATA.  That one that was recently listed on eBay for $45, and I'm now kicking myself for not bidding on it.  Does anyone know if "BYOD" always means that the associated VoIP service can be one of the two services hooked to an Obihai device?

TimDan
Logged
Stewart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1125


« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2012, 08:33:35 am »

Although there are some restrictions, an OBi can in most cases interface with many services.

Skype would not usually be near the top of my list of VoIP providers.  IMO, there are two good reasons to use it:  Your contacts already have Skype, or they are behind restrictive firewalls (corporate, hotel, etc.) over which they have no administrative control.

For calling to and from PSTN numbers and/or VoIP devices, you might look at these companies, all of which are directly compatible with the OBi:

Callcentric, Anveo (excellent quality, reliability, support, feature set, offer 911 service).

VoIP.ms, CallWithUs, Future-Nine (a step down, but with lower rates and routing flexibility).

Localphone, Voxbeam (two brands of the same company).  Localphone can do many tricks; Voxbeam has aggressive rates but some gotchas making it only suitable for heavy users.  Both offer free trials.

Betamax companies (see list http://backsla.sh/betamax ).  The lowest prices to most destinations, but IMO you get what you pay for.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 08:44:46 am by Stewart » Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2012, 09:35:53 am »

Although there are some restrictions, an OBi can in most cases interface with many services.
Skype would not usually be near the top of my list of VoIP providers.

I'm... uh... currently "price-sensitive".  Grin  And at least with Skype's PC-to-landline service in S. California, it has been quite good.  Other VoIP services that I am considering are Nettalk and Voipo.  With services like Voip.ms which have only per-minute rates (e.g. 1.5 cents/min within the U.S.), I'd be paying something like $20/month, which puts it out of my category.

TimDan
Logged
RonR
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4527


« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2012, 09:50:42 am »

I read repeatedly that the OBi100 and OB110 can interface with two VoIP services, but I've never seen a list of the specific VoIP services which can be used.

The OBi can interface with two VoIP services : SP1/Service Provider 1 and SP2/Service Provider 2.  These Service Providers can be either Google Voice or virtually any VoIP provider who uses SIP protocol.  Skype is/uses neither of these and is not supported natively.
Logged
Stewart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1125


« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2012, 09:55:27 am »

In your first post, you asked about a supplement to GV, so I assumed it was for 911, lower cost international calling, or some other function that GV doesn't handle.  Since GV domestic calls are free (at least for this year), wouldn't that mean relatively few US outgoing minutes with the alternate provider?

You might also consider providers such as VOIPo or Phonepower; if you can afford to pay for a year up front, they both offer good values for "unlimited" calling, and both have a "cloned line" feature, so you can make or receive a call while another family member is on the phone.  These companies normally supply the required ATA, but also permit BYOD with some restrictions.  Future-Nine's America Free plan might also be a good fit for your usage level.
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2012, 10:47:25 am »

I read repeatedly that the OBi100 and OB110 can interface with two VoIP services, but I've never seen a list of the specific VoIP services which can be used.

The OBi can interface with two VoIP services : SP1/Service Provider 1 and SP2/Service Provider 2.  These Service Providers can be either Google Voice or virtually any VoIP provider who uses SIP protocol.  Skype is/uses neither of these and is not supported natively.

Thanks for the explicit statement on Skype/Obi compatibility, RonR.

TimDan
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2012, 11:28:00 am »

In your first post, you asked about a supplement to GV, so I assumed it was for 911, lower cost international calling, or some other function that GV doesn't handle.  Since GV domestic calls are free (at least for this year), wouldn't that mean relatively few US outgoing minutes with the alternate provider?

My interest in VoIP is to significantly reduce my domestic outgoing call bill - currently about $35/month for AT&T landline.  I make virtually no calls to foreign destinations, and I have a landline for incoming calls - which I may also switch to VoIP if I can keep its number.  Since VoIP at my price point may not always be available due to temporary server outages, I want an alternative VoIP service to be available.  I also want to keep the number of devices and their cabling at a minimum.  It appears now that if I cannot find 2 suitable SIP VoIP services to work with an Obihai device, I shall have to use 2 ATAs, one for each line of my 2-line telephone, or to switch between 2 ATAs with a $15 R11 manual switch.  Of course, using a single Obihai device and 2 SIP providers keeps the device count and cabling down, and that would be my preference.  The attraction of Skype is the no. of people with Skype accounts and my satisfactory experience with Skype using a PC-based client.

Quote
You might also consider providers such as VOIPo or Phonepower...  These companies normally supply the required ATA, but also permit BYOD with some restrictions.  Future-Nine's America Free plan might also be a good fit for your usage level.

Number portability and geographical location (southern California) of Voipo look good since most of my calls are to numbers in S. Cal., and Voipo's backer is HostGator, a S. Cal web hosting firm.  Have you heard if Voipo is compatible with Obihai's ATAs?

TimDan
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2012, 12:09:36 pm »

I also want to keep the number of devices and their cabling at a minimum.

Another reason for that is that I have only 1 port remaining free on my 4-port router.  If I were to use 2 or more ATAs, I'd have to get a new router with more ports.  Thus my interest in using 1 ATA for both VoIP services.

TimDan
Logged
RonR
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4527


« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2012, 12:27:23 pm »

Another reason for that is that I have only 1 port remaining free on my 4-port router.  If I were to use 2 or more ATAs, I'd have to get a new router with more ports.  Thus my interest in using 1 ATA for both VoIP services.

You can expand to more ports by using an Ethernet switch connected to your last router port.

In an earlier post, you mentioned having a two-line telephone.  I hope you're aware that the OBi supports single-line telephones only.  Although the OBi supports two VoIP service provider channelss, one proprietary OBiTALK channel, and a PSTN line, only one single-line telephone can be connected to the PHONE Port.
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2012, 01:12:46 pm »

... you mentioned having a two-line telephone.  I hope you're aware that the OBi supports single-line telephones only.  Although the OBi supports two VoIP service provider channelss, one proprietary OBiTALK channel, and a PSTN line, only one single-line telephone can be connected to the PHONE Port.

Yup.  I momentariy forgot that only one telephone can act as the analog interface for an OBi ATA.  I'd have to use 2 ATAs to make my 2-line telephone totally VoIP, and then I'd still have to manually select which line to use just as I do now with 2 landlines.  With an Obihai ATA, though, I'd be able to use one "line" for 2 VoIP services, selecting which VoIP service with a **1 or **2 prefix (I gather).  Since I don't have any need for bridging between the landline and any VoIP service, I don't need the OBi110 and its PHONE port.

TimDan
Logged
RonR
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4527


« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2012, 01:30:08 pm »

Since I don't have any need for bridging between the landline and any VoIP service, I don't need the OBi110 and its PHONE port.

Unless you need the smaller size of the OBi100,  I'd spend the extra couple of dollars on the OBi110 just to have the LINE Port.  It can be used to connect another ATA , a Skype adapter, a MagicJack, or whatever.

Once you have the ability to bridge various services together, you'll be surprised at the ideas you come up with.
Logged
Stewart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1125


« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2012, 08:08:14 pm »

First, you need to decide whether you will be keeping a landline (possibly dropping to a "measured", "low-use", or "lifeline" service).  In an emergency, a landline will usually be the most reliable; VoIP won't work if your power, equipment, Internet connection or provider fails.  However, if cellular coverage inside your home is good, you may decide that's an acceptable backup.  If you have an alarm system without cellular backup, don't trust it to VoIP.  Faxing is often iffy with VoIP, though you can also send faxes via an email-to-fax or web-to-fax service.  Finally, if you have DSL, porting your landline away will cause it to be disconnected; you would have to get a dry-loop DSL installed, or get service from another ISP.

If you get service from VOIPo (or one of their competitors), they will supply you with a two-port ATA.  Connected to two or more two-line phones, or to a two-line cordless base with multiple handsets, you will be able to make or answer a call from any phone, while another is in use.  Porting your landline number (if desired) will be no hassle.  You won't need to buy an OBi and you won't need to learn anything about VoIP.

If you are in the DIY mode, you can save more money and have a more flexible system.  One choice is an OBi with a combination of GV and Anveo.  Anveo's 911 is only $0.80/mo.  If desired, you can get a "value" incoming number for $0.99/mo., though you'll pay for calls if you exceed the 40 free minutes per day.  Outbound domestic calls are $0.01/min.  Since GV will be your primary provider, I would expect your minute usage on Anveo to be very low.  This system allows only one call at a time (except for three-way and call waiting).  If you want two concurrent calls, you can add a second ATA.  If the other ATA has a "router" function, e.g. SPA2102, you can set it up as a bridge, so it won't "burn" a port on your router.  OBi will also soon be releasing an ATA with two Ethernet ports.
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2012, 12:34:08 am »

Since I don't have any need for bridging between the landline and any VoIP service, I don't need the OBi110 and its PHONE port.
Unless you need the smaller size of the OBi100,  I'd spend the extra couple of dollars on the OBi110 just to have the LINE Port.  It can be used to connect another ATA , a Skype adapter, a MagicJack, or whatever.

Once you have the ability to bridge various services together, you'll be surprised at the ideas you come up with.

(I meant "LINE" instead of "PHONE" in my last post.)
Having the capability to bridge to a landline would make my imagination go crazy with new tricks to try and it would become a distracting obsession, I'm afraid.  Gotta think about that one...    Wink

TimDan

TimDan
Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2012, 12:50:05 am »

First, you need to decide whether you will be keeping a landline...

I had intended to keep the landline with minimal features for several of the reasons that you mention.

Quote
If you get service from VOIPo (or one of their competitors), they will supply you with a two-port ATA.  Connected to two or more two-line phones, or to a two-line cordless base with multiple handsets, you will be able to make or answer a call from any phone, while another is in use.  Porting your landline number (if desired) will be no hassle.  You won't need to buy an OBi and you won't need to learn anything about VoIP.

I'd like to use Google Voice for the free service through 2012 (and beyond if the service and price are right), and that seems to imply using an Obihai device.

Quote
If you are in the DIY mode...

Sorry, I'll have to turn a deaf ear - I'm starting to obsess...   Smiley

Quote
OBi will also soon be releasing an ATA with two Ethernet ports.

I've been reading about that device, the OBi202, and I've been hoping that Obihai would make some sort of announcement about it during the Consumer Electronic Show going on now.  But I haven't seen anything so far.  Could you clue me as to how one might use 2 ethernet ports?

TimDan
[/quote]
Logged
Stewart
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1125


« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2012, 01:16:21 am »

OK, so you'll be keeping a landline.  The next question is whether you need concurrent calls.  If not, the simplest solution is an OBi110, configured for GV, connected between your existing phones and the landline.  The OBi can easily be set to send most calls via GV, with 911 calls and those you specify (by dialing a prefix) going on the landline.

If the above does not meet your needs, be specific and I'll try to recommend something suitable.

The OBi202 (in addition to its router function) has two phone ports (it can handle concurrent calls), but no line port (it can't integrate with a landline).

Logged
TimDan
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 58


« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2012, 09:48:46 am »

OK, so you'll be keeping a landline.  The next question is whether you need concurrent calls.  If not, the simplest solution is an OBi110, configured for GV, connected between your existing phones and the landline.  The OBi can easily be set to send most calls via GV, with 911 calls and those you specify (by dialing a prefix) going on the landline.

Sounds good.  Via the landline, I'd route 911, FAXes (indicated by a prefix), and local area code calls (we include the area code even on local calls).

Quote
If the above does not meet your needs, be specific and I'll try to recommend something suitable.

Ignoring the 911 and FAX requirements for the moment, if I were to connect the analog side of a Skype or NetTalk ATA to the LINE port of an OBi110, would there be a noticeably added delay in the Skype/Nettalk calls?

Quote
The OBi202 (in addition to its router function) has two phone ports (it can handle concurrent calls), but no line port (it can't integrate with a landline).

OK on the 2 concurrent phones, but why would there be 2 ethernet ports?  I assume one would be for the Internet connection.  Would the other connect to a PC or a LAN?  If for a LAN, why not put the LAN router  between the Internet connection (e.g. modem) and the OBi202/PC?  Could putting the OBi202 at the lowest level be for congestion/QoS management?

TimDan
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC