Add Wireless Networking to the unit.

Started by glhrzw, March 04, 2011, 12:38:40 PM

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glhrzw

I think it is a good idea to add wireless lan to the unit. I know there is workaround, but it is still nice to have built-in wireless lan.

rangav

Would u mind sharing the work around? I need to free up the LAN port from the router.

RonR

Quote from: rangav on March 07, 2011, 03:31:09 PM
Would u mind sharing the work around? I need to free up the LAN port from the router.
If you have a spare router, many support a wireless ethernet bridge mode.  This effectively turns the router into a wireless ethernet switch, giving you five ethernet ports connected to your main router wirelessly.  If your router is compatible, Tomato and DD-WRT firmwares support wireless ethernet bridge mode.

biomesh

Or just use another ethernet switch.  Most "combo" devices tend to have issues due to the overly complex nature. 

QBZappy

Hi,
I use the router approach to add wireless capability to devices. I have an Asus RT N16 router moded with Tomato firmware. This approach offers wireless capability to any network device. Of course you need two wireless routers to accomplish this. Gives the Obi unit instant wireless capability. In addition to connecting the Obi unit some Asus router models have USB ports. This gives wireless capability to USB printers and web cams. If someone wants to go this route, Asus routers are nearly impossible to brick. If you are new at this sort of thing, this is the router to use. The popular linksys WRT routers seem to be more prone to bricking.

For those considering voip security using the Obi, the Tomato firmware offers VPN connectivity with an easy to use GUI interface (OpenVPN). Lots of other neat tricks can be accomplished using these custom router firmwares (Tomato/DDWRT). They are very easy to install on the Asus routers. At the moment the RT N16 model seems to be the hackers device of choice, because of its specs. Heck you can even install asterisk on the router. Makes for an interesting project.
Owner of the 1st OBi110/100 units in service in Canada & South America. 1st OBi202 on my street. 1st OBi1032 in Montreal.

RonR

Quote from: biomesh on March 08, 2011, 06:39:58 AM
Or just use another ethernet switch.  Most "combo" devices tend to have issues due to the overly complex nature.
That's fine if you have Cat5 going to where you need it.  For inaccessible locations, a router configured as a wireless ethernet bridge is an extremely simple and reliable solution.  I've been using it for years to connect my TiVo and DirecTV DVR's in the living room and bedroom to the Internet and haven't had any hiccups.

biomesh

Yes, a bridge is a good alternative.  I just think that adding wireless support into the product itself is unnecessary.

RonR

Quote from: biomesh on March 08, 2011, 10:18:06 AM
Yes, a bridge is a good alternative.  I just think that adding wireless support into the product itself is unnecessary.
I thought your reply was to me objecting to the general use of wireless ethernet bridges.

I agree 100% that the OBi110 doesn't need wireless built in.

Robpol86

Quote from: RonR on March 08, 2011, 10:29:28 AM
I agree 100% that the OBi110 doesn't need wireless built in.

I thought this as well until I read the PoE thread.  Here is a scenario if the Obi100 has wireless and was powered over USB:
You're in another country staying at a friend's place.  You use their AC USB adapter to power your Obi and have it connect to their wireless.  Their router is in the master bedroom and you have your Obi in your guest room.

One device, one power source.  If the Obi used the standard microusb for power then all you need to bring with you is a phone (or borrow your friend's phone!), your microusb cable (same one you use for your cell phone), and your Obi.

Just a thought.

rangav


guyinsb

Built-in wifi makes for less clutter.  I would buy 25 for my vacation condo rental pool.
We have 5 wifi routers scattered about the condo, but do not have Ethernet to most units.
But the market demand may not be that big.

guyinsb

On the other hand, small hotels could get rid of their expensive and hard to maintain pbx systems.

jb317

Another vote here for added wi-fi capability.  Sure, a wireless bridge is an option, but requires additional hardware and knowledge.  Built in wi-fi adds simplicity.

guyinsb

#13
Other reasons for built-in wifi:
- assuming the product still has an Ethernet port, it can itself be sold into two additional markets:
   1.  wireless bridge
   2.  wireless ATA

- it may soon be the case that many residences will obtain internet access strictly using their 4G phones as MiFi hotspots
 In this case, there is no Ethernet connection available

daibaan

Quote from: RonR on March 08, 2011, 10:12:36 AM
Quote from: biomesh on March 08, 2011, 06:39:58 AM
Or just use another ethernet switch.  Most "combo" devices tend to have issues due to the overly complex nature.
That's fine if you have Cat5 going to where you need it.  For inaccessible locations, a router configured as a wireless ethernet bridge is an extremely simple and reliable solution.  I've been using it for years to connect my TiVo and DirecTV DVR's in the living room and bedroom to the Internet and haven't had any hiccups.

If I use a DD-WRT router in wireless bridge mode for remote access, does my main router need to be configured in bridge mode too? or can I configure the main router to be in AP mode so that it can still serve other wireless clients and serve the remote router that is configured to be in bridge mode?

RonR

Quote from: daibaan on April 27, 2011, 10:03:06 PMIf I use a DD-WRT router in wireless bridge mode for remote access, does my main router need to be configured in bridge mode too? or can I configure the main router to be in AP mode so that it can still serve other wireless clients and serve the remote router that is configured to be in bridge mode?

No changes are necessary to your main router.  Leave it in AP mode and the router configured as a wireless ethernet bridge will communicate with it and provide four (or possibly 5) remote ethernet ports.

daibaan

Thanks, I have put DD-WRT on a fonera router, only one ethernet port available, I was play with various wireless modes, but got myself cut off from the fonera until I reset the NVRAM, never have time to resume my experiment