Just Bought OBi202 Need Help

Started by pwnage, March 17, 2013, 07:15:55 PM

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pwnage

I need to know how I can block specific numbers from being dialed out and from ringing in. For instance I dont want to be able to call my ex at xxx-xxx-xxxx as well as I dont want her to be able to call me. I heard that this device supported this type of functionality and was wondering if someone could show me how to use this.

giqcass

#1
That can be accomplished with the incoming and outgoing dial plans.

Replace the xxxxxxxxxx in the code below with your exes number. I suggest adding it both with and whitout the leading 1 to be sure.
Put it in your inbound call route and outbound call route at the very front.
The inbound call routes are located under the service providers.  The Outbound call routes are located under the physical devices.
{(xxxxxxxxxx|1xxxxxxxxxx):},



Long live our new ObiLords!

pwnage

How many numbers can be blocked using this? Can you block a whole range? And add a whitelist/?

Shale

#3
Quote from: giqcass on March 17, 2013, 08:36:51 PM

{(xxxxxxxxxx|1xxxxxxxxxx):},

I think that this would be a shorter equivalent to the above string:

{(1?xxxxxxxxxx):},

pwnage, what would a whitelist mean to you in this context? Would this be a list of the only numbers that you would permit dialing to? That could be done, but it would be unusual.

Regarding how big the blacklist could be, it is limited to how many characters fit in the string. The shorter each is written, the more fit.

So several things are possible.

RFord

You did not indicate who your VOIP provider is.  Blocking incoming calls is best handled at the provider level.  GV, Callcentric, VOIP.ms, Anveo, etc., allow you to block calls incoming calls in many formats or send these calls to voice mail or route them to other number(s).

If you need to block a outgoing number (or a series of numbers), the syntax is:

|!(1abcxxxxxxx)| or |!(1abcxxxxxxx|1abcxxxxxxx)| or , where abc is the area code, xxxxxxx is the digits associated with the block numbers

This would be incorporated into the ITSP Profile X>>>General>>>DigitMap

Shale

#5
Quote from: RFord on March 18, 2013, 02:19:58 AM

If you need to block a outgoing number (or a series of numbers), the syntax is:

|!(1abcxxxxxxx)| or |!(1abcxxxxxxx|1abcxxxxxxx)| or , where abc is the area code, xxxxxxx is the digits associated with the block numbers

This would be incorporated into the ITSP Profile X>>>General>>>DigitMap
You are not saying that the method pwnage suggested will not work, are you? I think his method would work also.

Here is an example line from Outbound Call Route Configuration
section of the OBi Device Administration Guide:
"!1900xxx xxxx – Barring all 11-digit numbers that start with 1900"

It was not clear at all to me where that would go into a DigitMap. Here is my actual ITSP Profile A Digit Map:

(1xxxxxxxxxx|<1>[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|011xx.|xx.|(Mipd)|[^*#]@@.)

Let's suppose the number to bar is 6065559999 (I don't like using x to represent a specific number, because x is used in real strings).
How would you modify
(1xxxxxxxxxx|<1>[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|011xx.|xx.|(Mipd)|[^*#]@@.)
to prevent dialing out to 6065559999 or 16065559999?


ianobi

Hold on, this could be a bumpy ride   :)   These call barring rules can be very tricky. I have looked at them before:
http://www.obitalk.com/forum/index.php?topic=4799.msg31198#msg31198


Let's look at this particular case. In theory this should work for an outgoing DigitMap:
(!1?6065559999|1xxxxxxxxxx|<1>[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|011xx.|xx.|(Mipd)|[^*#]@@.)

In practice it blocks 6065559999, but does not block 16065559999. This is because rule 1xxxxxxxxxx provides a better match for 16065559999 than the rule !1?6065559999. Looks crazy, but that's just how the "precedence rules" seem to work – this is not documented anywhere that I can find.

This digitMap does block both numbers:
(!16065559999|!6065559999|1xxxxxxxxxx|<1>[2-9]xxxxxxxxx|011xx.|xx.|(Mipd)|[^*#]@@.)


For an InboundCallRoute this, as suggested by Shale, should work:
{(1?6065559999):},

This is because there are unlikely to be other rules that might take precedence.

Confused? A lot of us are a lot of the time   :D