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Author Topic: Importing Google Contacts to Obi202  (Read 12110 times)
frankpc
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« on: January 19, 2017, 05:49:20 pm »

Do you have to subscribe to OBiEXTRAs to import your Google Contacts with the obi202 for CID Name support?

Thank you.
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frankpc
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2017, 08:21:37 pm »

Thanks.

I have tried it and it didn't work.  So I am looking for a reason why.  When I imported the contacts, I was told the process was successful.  However, when I tried it, no name was returned.

Perhaps I didn't wait long enough.  Or perhaps my Google Contacts format is wrong.  However, this morning, before I switched from my Google Fiber Phone module, to the Obi202, Google Contacts worked fine.

So, I am just trying to determine how it is supposed to work.  Right now, I am at a loss as to what to try next.  Although, perhaps subscribing, even for a test, might be wise.

Thanks again!
Frank
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2017, 09:04:17 pm »

I funnel my inbound calls through Callcentric, to get their CNAM.  In my particular case, I care more about CNAM for non-contacts, so it was a better option for me.

I should clarify my last post.  I was able to download the contacts.  I didn't try to use the feature on an inbound call  Roll Eyes because of my Callcentric setup.

I just now tested it.  I added one of my test phone numbers to my Google Contacts and gave it a distinctive name.  I clicked the "Import your Google Contacts" button under OBiEXTRAs settings, and I gave it permission do to so.  I rebooted the OBi.  I turned off my forwarding to Callcentric, and turned on forwarding to Chat, so I could test a direct call via GV.  The CNAM did not appear (I got the typical "OUT OF AREA" substitute).  I then imported the same Google Contacts list into my OBi IP phone, and it DID work.  So, you do need to subscribe to OBiEXTRAs for it to work on an OBi ATA.

Let us know if you experience the same, or different results.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 10:03:03 pm by SteveInWA » Logged

frankpc
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2017, 09:34:36 pm »

Interesting.  I appreciate your explanation of that.  Your test does seem to demonstrate the difference between the Obi phone and Obi ATA.  I did not reboot my Obi.  I can't test now because I would be shot.  But I will tomorrow.

I also care more about CNAM for non-contacts, which are calls I either want to block or are people I may not want to block but don't have in my phonebook.  My PC announces known callers on our 'intercom' system and it also blocks calls by name or number that are in my list.

Obviously, 'self-provision' of service is totally new to me.  Please correct me if I am wrong, but it seems reasonable to subscribe to OBiEXTRAs just to get the CID CNAM ability and the ability to upload contacts. And then to sign up with Anveo for 911.  While I originally thought Callcentric was free, other than the cost of 911, it appears that it is only free to call other Callcentric users.  Albeit their rates are very low.

It seems ObiHai makes it very convenient to use their OBiEXTRAs and Anveo.

In the morning, I'll do the reboot and see if that makes any difference.

Again, I appreciate your time and expertise Steve
Frank
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2017, 09:49:09 pm »

We're all learning as we go, given the lack of product documentation regarding OBiEXTRAs.

There are advantages and disadvantages to the OBi/GV contacts integration vs. using Callcentric.

  • The OBi/GV method will (in theory, if the darn thing works when you pay for the subscription) let you define any name or words you wish for the CNAM of a known contact.
  • It can't provide CNAM for callers not already in Contacts.
  • The "detour through Callcentric" method will provide some (often useless) CNAM information for most calling numbers.
  • Many calls from mobile phone numbers will just say "WIRELESS CALLER" or the name of the state or city.  This is a limitation of the CNAM system and the information provided by, or not provided by, the carriers that control those numbers.  For example, Sprint and T-Mobile generally feed their customers' names into the LIDBs for CNAM, but I don't know if VZW and AT&T do so.  Prepaid mobile phone numbers typically don't have CNAM information.
  • Most of use who use Callcentric for CNAM use one of CC's free NY State phone numbers for this purpose.  Since they are inbound calls, there's no charge from CC.  This might change this year, as the FCC is pushing carriers to stop charging each other for interconnection fees (CC may stop giving away service on these numbers).

IMO, CNAM is becoming less useful, as more and more customers are dropping traditional POTS telephone service, which historically had the highest percentage of well-maintained and accurate CNAM, thanks to the POTS carriers.  Some VoIP carriers will feed their customers' names into the system, and others don't.
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frankpc
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2017, 07:25:45 pm »

I hadn't considered the fact that CNAM lookup is less desirable than it once was.  That is a very good point and a good argument to be happy with maintaining your own Google Contacts database.  Actually, now that you point that out, it would be disappointing not to have the ability to build your own CID Names database.  And as can be inferred, CNAM lookup's accuracy will only get worse.

Last night I imported my Google Contacts to my Home number, which is on the Obi202. This morning, I called my Home number from my cell phone and my Home CID phone displayed my name.  So Google Contacts worked.  Then my daughter called and my wife called, and neither showed up. (??)  I decided to do the free trial of OBiEXTRAs and since doing so, all calls ( 6 or 7?) have come with a name.  But that isn't to say, I'm dead certain the OBiEXTRAs subscription fixed it. 

In addition, I also signed up for the Anveo 911 service.

Also today, I obtained a second gmail email account and number for the second line in the Obi202 and I imported my Google Contacts into that account.  Tomorrow I will experiment with that number and see whether CID on that line yields names.  If it doesn't, it would seem a OBiEXTRAs subscription is called for. 

I recall the days, when you would ask "The Telephone Company" to install a phone for you.
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Taoman
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2017, 08:41:15 pm »

I hadn't considered the fact that CNAM lookup is less desirable than it once was.  That is a very good point and a good argument to be happy with maintaining your own Google Contacts database.  Actually, now that you point that out, it would be disappointing not to have the ability to build your own CID Names database.  And as can be inferred, CNAM lookup's accuracy will only get worse.


This can also easily be done with Callcentric using their phone book and CNAM override capability. It's a simple matter to export your Google Contacts and import them into Callcentric's phone book. You then have the best of both worlds: true incoming CNAM for unknown callers and an editable phone book database so you can display anything you choose for all of your Contacts. While I agree that CNAM's usefulness has diminished it is still far better to have it than not. I pay .008 for every CNAM lookup at VoIP.ms. It's free thru Callcentric.

My 2 cents.

Edit: After looking at the different export formats that Google Contacts offers perhaps it won't be a "simple matter" to import it into Callcentric's phone book. You would need to export to a csv file and then load it into a spreadsheet program like Excel. You would then need to delete some columns and move some others around and then save it in order for Callcentric to be able to import it.
You can manually make a couple contacts in your Callcentric phone book and then export it to see the format you'll need to use.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 10:20:00 pm by Taoman » Logged
frankpc
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2017, 09:00:48 pm »

Good idea.

I'll try Callcentric tomorrow on my 2nd number after I give Google Voice & Google Contacts a chance to work.

Thanks for your involvement.

Frank
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2017, 10:06:52 pm »

I hadn't considered the fact that CNAM lookup is less desirable than it once was.  That is a very good point and a good argument to be happy with maintaining your own Google Contacts database.  Actually, now that you point that out, it would be disappointing not to have the ability to build your own CID Names database.  And as can be inferred, CNAM lookup's accuracy will only get worse.


It's a simple matter to export your Google Contacts and import them into Callcentric's phone book.


Have you successfully done that?  I tried to do it a few years ago and I gave up in frustration.  It was the same problem I've had in years past, trying to use a CSV file to move contacts from one email service to another:  I have a LOT of contacts.  They have various combinations of phone numbers classified as home, work, mobile, and/or fax.  It created a mess when I tried to export/import to CC's contacts.  If you built some snazzy Excel spreadsheet to massage them, then please share.
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frankpc
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2017, 10:19:03 pm »

I've had good luck with importing into Google Contacts.  Comes out perfect.  I only export/import the name and 7 types of phone numbers.  Perhaps 16 fields.  I have around 450 (good contacts and numbers to be blocked) maybe.  Then they are merged down to around 370 by Google Contacts.

It also worked well importing those into the Obi arrangement.

I haven't messed with CallCentric yet, but I plan to give that a shot tomorrow.  I'll let you know how that goes.
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Taoman
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2017, 10:26:35 pm »

I hadn't considered the fact that CNAM lookup is less desirable than it once was.  That is a very good point and a good argument to be happy with maintaining your own Google Contacts database.  Actually, now that you point that out, it would be disappointing not to have the ability to build your own CID Names database.  And as can be inferred, CNAM lookup's accuracy will only get worse.


It's a simple matter to export your Google Contacts and import them into Callcentric's phone book.


Have you successfully done that?  I tried to do it a few years ago and I gave up in frustration.  It was the same problem I've had in years past, trying to use a CSV file to move contacts from one email service to another:  I have a LOT of contacts.  They have various combinations of phone numbers classified as home, work, mobile, and/or fax.  It created a mess when I tried to export/import to CC's contacts.  If you built some snazzy Excel spreadsheet to massage them, then please share.

Ha. I was editing my post above while you were posting this. No I have not done it. As I said in my edit above you would need to load it in a spreadsheet and massage the file before importing into Callcentric.
And yes, if you have more than one number per Contact I can see how that will be a problem. It doesn't appear as if Callcentric even allows more than one number per Contact?

I obviously don't have as many Contacts as you. Callcentric makes it so easy to add a new number and make a Contact directly from the CDR that that is what I have mostly done. The rest I manually created.
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frankpc
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« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2017, 12:14:51 pm »

I set up a CC No.  And entered a CID number and name.  Like you say, it appears each number is assigned a name.  But it appears the same name can have any quantity of numbers as long as there is one number per record.

I don't use Excel to build my CID database - I use vb.net.  I need to modify it to place all the numbers in one field - each with a name in a second field.  I am almost sure that will work.

Currently, I need to figure out how to verify my CC number in Google Voice.   
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2017, 03:54:48 pm »


Currently, I need to figure out how to verify my CC number in Google Voice.


To detour inbound Google Voice calls through your CC DID number, then the procedure is:
  • Assuming that you have already obtained a Callcentric DID and you have assigned it a SIP password, go to the CC dashboard and open the "Preferences" -> "General" tab.  Enable CNAM for inbound calls.  Consider subscribing to CC E911 service; land line telephones should always have the ability to call 911.
  • Provision the CC DID number as a SP on your OBi.  (for example, GV is on SP1, and CC is on SP2).  The easiest way to do this is to use the OBiTALK portal.
  • While logged into the OBiTALK portal and viewing your dashboard, click the OBi device, for example, SP2.
  • On the next page, which displays OBiTALK Approved Service Providers, scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page, and click "OBiTALK Compatible Service Providers".  Read and click "Accept" at the warning about emergency calling.
  • On the next page, select Callcentric, fill in your CC DID SIP credentials and submit.  The "Callcentric number" is your Callcentric account number, and optionally, an extension suffix, e.g. 17771234567101.  The "Callcentric password" is the SIP password you made up and typed into the CC web portal.  It is NOT your CC account password, unless you happened to make both values the same.
  • Configure SP1 (GV) to be the default SP used for outbound calls, and SP2 (CC) to ring on inbound calls.
  • Finish the procedure and then call your CC DID from some other phone to confirm that it works.
  • Log into your Google Voice account and go to this page:  https://www.google.com/voice#phones
  • Click "Add another phone", and follow the instructions to add your CC DID number.  Put a check mark to the left of the CC number, and remove the check mark next to "Google Chat".
  • Call your GV number from some other phone number, and confirm that the call now forwards to the SP you configured for CC, and the phone rings, and displays the CNAM.

Note:  These instructions are valid as of 1/21/2017, and may change over time if either Google or Callcentric change their offerings.
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2017, 03:57:30 pm »

I hadn't considered the fact that CNAM lookup is less desirable than it once was.  That is a very good point and a good argument to be happy with maintaining your own Google Contacts database.  Actually, now that you point that out, it would be disappointing not to have the ability to build your own CID Names database.  And as can be inferred, CNAM lookup's accuracy will only get worse.


It's a simple matter to export your Google Contacts and import them into Callcentric's phone book.


Have you successfully done that?  I tried to do it a few years ago and I gave up in frustration.  It was the same problem I've had in years past, trying to use a CSV file to move contacts from one email service to another:  I have a LOT of contacts.  They have various combinations of phone numbers classified as home, work, mobile, and/or fax.  It created a mess when I tried to export/import to CC's contacts.  If you built some snazzy Excel spreadsheet to massage them, then please share.

Ha. I was editing my post above while you were posting this. No I have not done it. As I said in my edit above you would need to load it in a spreadsheet and massage the file before importing into Callcentric.
And yes, if you have more than one number per Contact I can see how that will be a problem. It doesn't appear as if Callcentric even allows more than one number per Contact?

I obviously don't have as many Contacts as you. Callcentric makes it so easy to add a new number and make a Contact directly from the CDR that that is what I have mostly done. The rest I manually created.

Yes, that was the issue that caused me to give up.  If you export GV contacts to a CSV file, you'd then need to either manually, or via VB automation, massage the file to make it have one column for the name, and another column for one and only one phone number.  I'm not a Excel/VB expert, so I didn't do it.
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frankpc
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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2017, 08:37:15 pm »


To detour inbound Google Voice calls through your CC DID number, then the procedure is:


I'm disappointed to say I have no idea what I was doing wrong, but I followed your procedure many times.  And all is now working!  I need to work on getting contacts in there to see how that does.  Progress!

Thank you Steve!
Frank

EDIT: I figured out the reason the process didn't work initially was because I had followed procedures documented in  several older posts.  The procedure shown above does work!
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 06:16:03 pm by frankpc » Logged
SteveInWA
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« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2017, 08:42:07 pm »

Just to confirm:  yes, you do need and OBiEXTRAs subscription to match inbound GV calls to an imported Google Contacts list on an OBi ATA.  The feature is supported on OBi IP phones without OBiEXTRAs, since they can store and manage contacts locally.
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frankpc
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« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2017, 08:55:53 pm »

Good to know.  Makes sense.  Thanks for confirmation Steve.

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frankpc
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« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2017, 06:12:51 pm »

Just to confirm:  yes, you do need and OBiEXTRAs subscription to match inbound GV calls to an imported Google Contacts list on an OBi ATA. 

My free ObiEXTRAs trial will expire tomorrow.  So I plan to start a paid plan now.

Do we know why an ObiEXTRAs subscription is required to enable CID Name to work?  It seems Google Voice searches your Google Contacts database when an incoming call occurs.  And then forwards the CID name and number to your Obi ATA.  Does the Obi ATA simply block the name if you have no ObiEXTRAs subscription?

Prior to replacing my original Google Fiber Phone module with the Obi202, I had uploaded my contacts to Google Contacts.  After doing so, my CID Names and Numbers appeared on my hardwired telephones.  However, my alarm system could not upload data through the original ATA.  So I switched to the Obi.

My Obi202 has worked flawlessly with my Google Voice number and Google Voice Contacts (and alarm system) for a month now.  I uploaded 520 phone numbers to both Google Voice Contacts and to the CallCentric Phonebook.

As information, my Google Voice contacts CSV file consists of three fields: Family Name, Phone 1 - Value, and Phone 1 - Type.  Field titles are included with the upload.

And the CallCentric PhoneBook CSV file consists of four fields: A blank field, a name field, a number field, and a phone type field.  No field titles are included with the upload.

All the phone numbers include a leading "1".  So 11 digits total.


Thanks!
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SteveInWA
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« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2017, 06:25:19 pm »

Quote
Do we know why an ObiEXTRAs subscription is required to enable CID Name to work?  It seems Google Voice searches your Google Contacts database when an incoming call occurs.  And then forwards the CID name and number to your Obi ATA.  Does the Obi ATA simply block the name if you have no ObiEXTRAs subscription?

No, it doesn't do that.

Google Voice only sends the caller ID number, which is no different than PSTN carriers.  It does not search, find, nor send the name using the caller ID protocol.

What Obihai is doing, is, with your permission, separately accessing your Google Contacts list.  Obihai is doing the matching, not Google.

Bottom line, you have choices:

  • Pay for OBiEXTRAs, to have Obihai do the lookups, or,
  • Forward the inbound Google Voice calls through a SIP DID from a provider that does the CNAM lookups, or,
  • Use Google Voice without CNAM, or,
  • Don't use Google Voice.
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frankpc
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« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2017, 06:54:11 pm »

Google Fiber's Phone uses Google Voice and their CID arrangement utilizes Google Contacts to match a name to a number and forwards the CID name and number to your hard wired phone via their ATA.  (Pictures of the OBi200 look close to identical to the Google Fiber ATA.  I've wondered whether they are both made by the same company).

From the Google Fiber setup info:
"On incoming calls, the Caller ID with name option displays names from your Google Contacts and Google Maps (in addition to the telephone number). This option is enabled by default, and can be disabled on the Phone settings page."

I only used this arrangement for a short time.  But it worked well.

I don't understand why there is a difference with the functionality between the two.  I'm sure I'm missing something here, but can't figure out what it is.

Thanks Steve,
Frank
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