Gotta add support for NoMoRobo! Stops the spam callers before they ring you!

Started by Crow550, October 01, 2013, 11:38:59 PM

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Crow550

http://www.nomorobo.com/

More info: http://www.today.com/money/you-can-say-goodbye-annoying-automated-robocalls-8C11279205

Would be cool if something like Mr.Number or Current Caller ID by White Pages could be added too.

Google Voice has awesome phone spam filtering but it could always be improved. Plus for non-G-Voice users.

Shale

No design changes to the OBi required for incoming VOIP calls. Reading http://www.insidearm.com/daily/debt-collection-news/accounts-receivables-management/insulating-consumers-from-robo-calls-may-have-consequences/ it seems to imply that you could just fork the call to the service.

It will only pick up if the caller ID is on its naughty list. You could fork such that you phone does not ring until the service has had a chance to act. That adds a delay. Your other choice is to let your phone ring immediately, but you would hear one ring for calls that get eliminated.

I wonder if they make their money by locating in place that charges high incoming call rates, as the free conference call places do.

I hope this does not become the norm, because it would probably have telemarketers spoof numbers more often. I would like to see those serial DNC list telemarketers sent to prison without TV for a while.

CLTGreg

I call B.S. on any company that wants my e-mail name before telling me what's available to me. OTOH the healthcare.gov is doing that too.

Ironic for me not to trust someone that won an FTC competition. Perhaps technology hasn't caught up to allow the presentation of details in real time via a web browser.

Lavarock7

I also think that they support more of the VOIP services then they think.

The webpage asks for your supplier but then says that a company such as CallCentric or Voip.MS is not supported. If I understand the system, they want the call forked to your device and them. I certainly can do that with a multiple ring setup in both providers.
My websites: Kona Coffee: http://itskona.com and Web Hosting: http://planetaloha.info
A simplified Voip explanation: http://voip.planet-aloha.com

giqcass

This is only a half measure.  The companies that do this illegally can just spoof the outgoing number so it looks like a call ID already on the whitelist.  The call will go straight through.  Robo dialers will also learn to press the appropriate numbers using speech recognition.  Once they start using customer data to whitelist companies will probably use spamming to get themselves on the whitelist.  I'm sure this will work temporarily but your own whitelist  is still the best option.

I came up with a similar solution using the OBi202 and a customized Auto attendant.  Calls go through Google voice.  Non whitelist numbers get forwarded to the OBI Auto attendant.  A customized recording tells them what numbers to push in order to ring my phone.  Whitelist numbers must be added manually to Google voice.  It works but there are security issues I never worked out.
Long live our new ObiLords!

maxdoe

Quote from: CLTGreg on October 03, 2013, 06:58:12 AM
I call B.S. on any company that wants my e-mail name before telling me what's available to me. OTOH the healthcare.gov is doing that too.

Ironic for me not to trust someone that won an FTC competition. Perhaps technology hasn't caught up to allow the presentation of details in real time via a web browser.

this! I think health is a very important issue. At the moment, I have some health issues myself. I used to take phenibut for this, but I am looking for alternatives right now. I already found some information on that page, but I have not decided yet what sounds best.

SteveInWA

Quote from: maxdoe on September 29, 2018, 09:17:40 AM
Quote from: CLTGreg on October 03, 2013, 06:58:12 AM
I call B.S. on any company that wants my e-mail name before telling me what's available to me. OTOH the healthcare.gov is doing that too.

Ironic for me not to trust someone that won an FTC competition. Perhaps technology hasn't caught up to allow the presentation of details in real time via a web browser.

this

That is preposterous, tinfoil hat paranoia.  Go back to Breitbart where you belong.